Home Design – Residential Architecture

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CELEBRATING, RAIN AND SHINE

The house called Rainwater is a complex composition of four simple volumes — residence, guest house, office, garage — each capped with a planar steel roof rakishly tilted to channel water down to a single cantilevered corner.

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WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE : DECKS PART I

“Wood brings us back to roots of our building heritage,” says Seattle landscape architect Daniel Winterbottom. “The differing grains, colors, and expressions inherent in the material give wood a warm lively quality found in few other materials.”

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WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART II

Last week, Part I of this series discussed the origins of wood decks and basic framing systems. This week our five part series continues with the fundamentals of foundations.

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WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART III

This article continues our five part series on deck construction with a discussion of beams and joists, how to build with them, and how to avoid common problems.

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WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART IV

This article continues our five part series on deck construction. In this installment, we look at decking and stairs—installing decking to ensure its long life, bracing the structure, and constructing stringers and steps.

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WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART V

This article concludes our five-part series on deck construction. This time we look at seating and railings. Although there are many options for designing railings, they can be strictly regulated by local building codes.

Seating

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DETAILING THE NOT SO BIG HOUSE

Previously, ArchitectureWeek explored the popular ideas of architect Sarah Susanka in “Big Ideas Behind Not So Big Houses”. In her new book “Creating the Not So Big House,” Susanka explains and illustrates spatial design concepts in a way that makes it easy for readers to apply them in their own houses.

Three of these detailing design concepts are discussed in this excerpt, and illustrated with houses from three different regions of the United States.

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LOUIS SULLIVAN’S BRADLEY HOUSE

Though perhaps best known for his public buildings in late 19th century Chicago, Louis Sullivan was also a superb residential architect, master of the style later developed further by Frank Lloyd Wright. One of Sullivan’s finest examples is the Bradley House, 1910. A comparison of the completed house to its preliminary design drawings reveals much about the master’s thought processes.

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A MASTER ARCHITECT OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Editor’s note: Roland Terry has been one of Seattle, Washington’s most beloved architects for nearly 50 years. He was a practitioner of the “Northwest Style,” along with Pietro Belluschi and John Yeon. The following is an excerpt from a recently published retrospective of his work, based on interviews with Terry’s contemporaries.

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BIG IDEAS BEHIND NOT SO BIG HOUSES

When someone buys a Mercedes Benz or Jaguar, they look for quality, comfort, and detail. Size has nothing to do with the appeal of these cars. If you wanted nothing but space, you could buy a truck. Why is it, then, that some people feel compelled to buy huge houses with empty, cathedral-like spaces that offer few comforts of home?

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A MODERN HOUSE STEEPED IN MEXICAN TRADITION

We have just experienced one of our greatest joys as architects: designing and building a second home for ourselves in Mexico. Our goal was to create a house that would be strong, embracing yet transparent, and layered in color, form, and emotion: completely modern yet saturated with Mexican traditions.

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INSPIRED BY GAUDI, BUILT BY HAND

Sitting in Beth and Will Hathaway’s family room in Portland, Oregon, I’m amazed that there’s more than a hundred tons of concrete and dirt hanging over my head. The south-facing room, the focal point of the house, is bathed in light. So much daylight filters through four floor-to-curved-ceiling windows and two skylight domes, that I can comfortably pour over a puzzling array of structural contours on a blueprint even though no electric lamps are lit and it’s drizzling outside.

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