Tag: lessons

This Mothers Day, 7 Designers Share the Style Lessons They Learned From Their Moms

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Courtesy of Nate Berkus, Sarah Sherman Samuel and Bobby Berk; Photography by Laure Joliet.

For many of our favorite designers, great style started at home. In honor of Mother’s Day, we asked everyone from Bobby Berk of Queer Eye to designer and author Justina Blakeney about the design lessons they learned from their moms (or grandmothers and other mother figures).

What are the tips they picked up from the most important women in their lives? They learned how to stay organized, mix high-end and vintage pieces, incorporate art into a space, and more. Some of them, like Nate Berkus, were lucky enough to have moms who were interior designers themselves. Read on for the best lessons that continue to guide these designers today. 

Bobby Berk, interior designer and television personality

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Courtesy of Bobby Berk

One of the big ways my mother, Connie, influenced me is my organization and cleanliness. From

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Frank Lloyd Wright ‘virtual classroom’ offers design lessons for K-12

In the time of social distancing, learning has taken on a whole new dimension. Namely, it’s happening at home, and it’s happening online. For any young architecture and design fans cooped up at home right now, an intriguing new virtual education opportunity is on the way.

Starting April 15, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation is launching the “Frank Lloyd Wright Virtual Classroom,” a six-week program designed to help students (K–12) use the iconic architect’s life and work as a jumping off point for learning.

The foundation worked with Arizona’s Paradise Valley School District to develop the curriculum, which it describes as “STEAM-focused mini-lessons” that pull in a variety of subject matters from art to math to a little bit of design theory.

The first lesson, which is available now, is like a mini design history lesson that focuses on Wright’s life. After watching a video, students are asked to

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Interior design lessons from the coronavirus

We should think differently about our material and finish choices.

I wish I lived in Tottenville. It’s a town imagined by Waldemar Kaempffert of the New York Times in 1950 and published in Popular Mechanics, imagining what life will be like in 2000. “Tottenville is as clean as a whistle and quiet. It is a crime to burn raw coal and pollute air with smoke and soot. In the homes electricity is used to warm walls and to cook.”

When Jane Dobson cleans house she simply turns the hose on everything. Why not? Furniture (upholstery included), rugs, draperies, unscratchable floors – all are made of synthetic fabric or waterproof plastic. After the water has run down a drain in the middle of the floor (later concealed by a rug of synthetic fiber) Jane turns on a blast of hot air and dries everything. A detergent in the water dissolves any

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Home design lessons from the coronavirus

It’s time for a rethink about what’s really important in a home.

Four years ago I wrote a series of posts about how antibiotic resistance will change the way we live. It resulted from a worry that we would soon be back to the world between the great wars, when scientists and doctors knew what caused diseases like tuberculosis, but couldn’t do anything about them. Now we are in that situation again with COVID-19 and might well be in it for years to come, and unlike antibiotic resistance, this is staring us in the face right now. So I am going to summarize the thoughts from the previous posts, and add a few new ones.

1. Bring back the vestibule.

Even in apartments, there should be a vestibule with a door on each end, a big closet, and enough room to take off your coat and shoes without entering the

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